Movement RX for Acute Lower Back Pain

Dear Movers,

Have you ever experienced lower back pain (LBP) that makes you miss work or play? If the answer is yes, you are not alone. Lower back pain is one of the most common health issues that we face today. If you have experienced or are experiencing LBP, you may be interested in the new guideline for non-invasive treatment of acute (short term) LBP published in February 2017 by the American College of Physicians.

The ACP tells acute LBP sufferers to “Stay active and wait it out.”  It recommends that doctors avoid prescribing painkillers, muscle relaxants, anti-inflammatories, and steroid injections, and have their acute LPB patients try alternative therapies like exercise, acupuncture, massage, or yoga.

Note that the ACP guidelines apply to persons with acute (not chronic) LBP. Acute LBP is the most common type of LBP and involves pain that is present for 4 weeks or less and does not radiate down the leg. Acute, short term LBP is a biomechanical disturbance of the way that the spine, muscle, intervertebral discs, and nerves fit together. It may arise suddenly because of an accident or lifting something heavy. Or it may occur gradually because of age-related changes to the spine or sedentary lifestyles.

The ACP guidelines do not apply to LBP that is subacute (lasting 4-12 weeks) or chronic (lasting 12 weeks or longer). Long term LBP may require other kinds of treatment, including surgery.

With that in mind, I would like to describe several of my favorite intelligent moves that may help with you with short term LPB. Be mindful and easy as you practice these moves. Listen to your body. Listen to your inner athlete (everybody has one!). If any move creates any pain or tension, make it smaller or stop altogether. If the move involves moving your legs, make sure that you are using your legs and not your lower back.

Try the moves that appeal to you and your inner athlete. Then choose three or four and make them part of your daily movement practice. Do the ACP guidelines work for you? Let me know your results.

Note: These suggestions are intended to assist you in improving your health and overall well-being and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a medical professional.

Personally, I know that a practice of aware, intelligent movement can change the trajectory of a fragile lower back. I had a laminectomy at Ll5-S1 in 1979, spent over a decade following the surgery experiencing periodic relapses into pain that sent me to bed for weeks. Finally, I discovered through trial and error and my ongoing interest is moving better, that moving less was not helpful. Over the years, I have collected moves that I practice regularly to maintain a stable lower back. Relapses are few and far between. The last one was over five years ago. And even then, I was able to recover quickly by moving often but keeping my lumbar quiet and stable as I moved. Now, I listen to my body, when my lower back feels unstable, I direct the focus of my movement practice on the moves that I have shared with. It works every time! I am very happy to be able to share these tips and tricks with you. Have fun!

  1. Bent Knee Leg Lifts
    1. Lay on the floor with both knees bent and the feet parallel and hip width apart.
    2. Create more stability for your lower back by placing a yoga brick between your feet with the inner edges of your feet against the outer edges of the brick.
    3. Spend a few minutes watching your breath.
    4. Keep the pelvis and spine neutral and your lower back stable on the floor. You may wish to place a small towel roll under you at your waist to stabilize the lumbar. Check with your inner athlete.
    5. Gently lift the pelvic floor as if you were zipping a zipper that starts at the pubis and ends at the naval. Do not use your buttocks and do not flatten your lower back.
    6. Breathe easily. Check in with your inner athlete.
    7. Exhale, slowly bring one bent knee up until the knee hovers over the hip (about 90 degrees). Maintain the 90-degree angle.
    8. Inhale, slowly return that leg to its original position.
    9. Keep the upper body (neck and shoulders) and pelvis quiet (except for the pelvic floor lift which continues throughout).
    10. Pay attention to the breath, the movement, and your sensations throughout.
    11. If you experience any pain, including any pain in the lower back, make the movement smaller, don’t lift the leg as high off the floor, or stop altogether.
    12. Repeat 6 times. Switch to the other side and repeat there.
  2. Knee Drops
    1. Lay on the floor with both knees bent and the feet parallel and hip width apart.
    2. Create more stability for your lower back by placing a yoga brick between your feet with the inner edges of your feet against the outside edge of the brick.
    3. Spend a few minutes watching your breath.
    4. Keep the pelvis and spine neutral and your lower back stable on the floor. You may wish to place a small towel roll under you at your waist to stabilize the lumbar. Check with your inner athlete.
    5. Gently life the pelvic floor as if you were zipping a zipper that starts and the pubis and ends at the naval. Do not use your buttocks and do not flatten your lower back.
    6. Breathe easily.
    7. Exhale, move your right knee out to the ride side. Move only as far as the pelvis remains stable and the left leg does not get involved. This may be a very small movement.
    8. Keep the upper body (neck and shoulders) and pelvis quiet (except for the pelvic floor lift which continues throughout).
    9. Inhale, slowly return that leg to its original position.
    10. Pay attention to the breath, the movement, and your sensations throughout.
    11. Repeat 6 times. Switch to the other side and repeat there.
  3. Figure 4
    1. Lay on the floor with both knees bent and the feet parallel and hip width apart.
    2. Spend a few minutes watching your breath.
    3. Keep the pelvis and spine neutral and your lower back stable on the floor. You may wish to place a small towel roll under you at your waist to stabilize the lumbar. Check with your inner athlete.
    4. Gently lift the pelvic floor as if you were zipping a zipper that starts at the pubis and ends at the naval. Do not use your buttocks and do not flatten your lower back.
    5. Breathe easily.
    6. Exhale, slowly bring the R bent knee up until the knee is as far forward as it can go without moving the hip or pelvis.
    7. Then bring the R ankle across the body to rest in front of the left knee.
    8. Stay here and breath. Check in with your inner athlete.
    9. Place your R hand on the inside of your right knee. Press the hand against the knee and the knee against the hand. Keeping that resistance, let the hand win and then let the knee win. Back and forth. Back and forth. With resistance. 4 times.
    10. Then places both hands on the back of your left thigh. Pull the left thigh toward the face without moving the hip or pelvis. Hold for several minutes.
    11. Pay attention to the breath, the movement, and your sensations throughout.
    12. If you experience any pain, including any pain in the lower back, make the movement smaller, don’t lift the leg as high off the floor, or stop altogether.
    13. Switch sides and repeat the pattern on that side.
  4. Revolved Abdomen with a Brick
    1. Lay on the floor with both knees bent and the feet parallel and hip width apart. Place a yoga brick on narrow setting between your thighs.
    2. Spend a few minutes watching your breath.
    3. Keep the pelvis and spine neutral and your lower back stable on the floor. You may wish to place a small towel roll under you at your waist to stabilize the lumbar. Check with your inner athlete.
    4. Gently life the pelvic floor as if you were zipping a zipper that starts and the pubis and ends at the naval. Do not use your buttocks and do not flatten your lower back.
    5. Bring your knees toward your face but no more than 90 degrees. Keep your pelvis and spine in neutral. Press into the brick between your knees.
    6. Breathe easily.
    7. Inhale to prepare.
    8. Exhale, move your right knee out to the right side. As you revolve squeeze the brick, especially with your top knee.
    9. Move only as far as the pelvis remains stable, the knees stay even and matching, and the arms stay on the floor. You will probably not go all the way the left leg does not get involved.
    10. Keep the upper body (neck and shoulders) and pelvis quiet (except for the pelvic floor lift which continues throughout).
    11. Inhale, slowly return your knees to the original position.
    12. Repeat on the other side.
    13. Pay attention to the breath, the movement, and your sensations throughout.
    14. Repeat the entire pattern 6 times.
  5. Bonus #1: Therapy Balls Glute Release
    1. Lay on the floor with both knees bent and the feet parallel and hip width apart.
    2. Keep the pelvis and spine neutral and your lower back stable on the floor. You may wish to place a small towel roll under you at your waist to stabilize the lumbar. Check with your inner athlete.
    3. Spend a few minutes watching your breath.
    4. Place a Roll ModelÔTherapy Ball under each buttocks. In Puerto Vallarta, you can purchase Roll ModelÔTherapy Balls at Intelligent Movement Forever (send me an email) or Yoga Vallarta. In the US, you can purchase at my website online store, www.intelligentmovementforever.com.
    5. Allow the balls to nuzzle into the deep buttocks muscles. Listen to your inner athlete. Move the balls to a slightly different location, if needed, stop altogether, or coming to standing and lean into the therapy balls at the wall.
    6. This work may be very intense if you have piriformis issues although it may also be very good for the piriformis if you stick with it, go slowly, move at your own speed, and listen to your inner guidance.
    7. Bring the soles of your feet together and allow your knees to open away from each other.
    8. Stay there and watch your breath.
    9. Tighten your buttocks for a few seconds and then release. 5 to 8 times.
    10. Pay attention to the breath, the movement, and your sensations throughout.
    11. Remove the therapy balls and return your buttocks to the floor without the therapy balls.
    12. Observe your sensations.
  6. Bonus #2: Wearable Lumbar Stability Ball
    1. To create lumber stability for your lower back while you are seated, wherever you are seated with a backrest or chair back, consider wearing a Lumbar Stability BallÔ created by Intelligent Movement Forever.
    2. This inflatable, no-latex sponge ball comes in a wearable polyester drawstring backpack allowing you to move from one place to another and always have the lumbar support you need without extra effort.
    3. The placement of the ball can be adjusted by (1) adjusting the drawstring cord, (2) changing the degree of inflation of the ball, or adjusting the placement of the ball lower or higher ono your lower back.
    4. The IMF Lumbar Stability BallÔ supports and stabilizes the lumbar spine to relieve lower back pain and strain. It allows and encourages your chest to open, improves seated good posture, and naturally aligns the spine.
    5. In Puerto Vallarta, you can purchase the IMF Lumbar Stability Ball at Intelligent Movement Forever (send me an email at yogawithvia@gmail.com). In the US, you can purchase it at my website online store, www.intelligentmovementforever.com.

Summary

Fortunately, there are measures you can take to relieve most (short term) back pain episodes. Proper body mechanics and target intelligent moves like the ones we have presented here will help heal your back within a few weeks and keep it functional for the long haul. Medical professionals, including the ACP, are agreeing with this good news.

When you have acute LBP, check with your medical professional, practice moves like these, listen to your inner athlete, and wait. You may be surprised and happy with the outcome.

Please contact me at yogawithvia@gmail.com or 971 708 9261 if you would like to work with my privately or join my 90-day online course, MoveEasy101.                                  

7 Tips for Creating Healthy Habits

7 Tips for Creating Healthy Habits

Via squatting with a chair

Via squatting with a chair

Dear Movers,

In this column, I am going to consider with you the possibility of creating a new healthy habit and how to do that. The topic arose for me, and now for you, when I started, but did not complete a 30-day squat challenge for myself on January 1 of this year and invited my friends and clients to join me.

Because I am well-aware of the benefits of squatting, I had hoped that I could create a new behavior pattern for myself. I wanted (and still want) squatting to become a habit, like flossing my teeth. Something I didn’t think about, but I did without thought. Cynthia Allen includes squats in her list of “7 Moves You Need for Graceful Moving” and points out that “Part of our developmental and evolutionary heritage is the ability to squat” and “Squats make every other function better.”

However, I must confess that I did not complete my own squat challenge. I had even set up a private Facebook support group and 10 people did join me in my journey. But my own resolve fell apart about mid-month, with the very real distraction of my husband’s hospitalization with a serious illness.

Things are smoothing out a bit now. I think I have more room to make this commitment and I started all over again on February 1st. And I became curious about how healthy habits are created and how I could help myself and others create a new habit, whether it be squatting or another healthy habit of their own choosing. Since I teach and practice intelligent movement, I am especially interested in how to create healthy habits that support more movement and more intelligent movement. But the same steps are available to anyone who wants to create a new habit.

A habit is something acquired by frequent repetition that you do regularly, often without knowing that you are doing it. It is a routine and habitual action without resistance or second-thought. Like brushing your teeth or flossing. I brush my teeth every day and I don’t even think about it. It’s just what I do. Originally, many years ago, I started brushing my teeth because my parents and my dentist told me it was good for me. Now brushing my teeth is a healthy habit. I do it without thinking about it. That is what I want squatting to become for me.

Our brain is very efficient. The brain likes to take a sequence of actions and convert them into an automatic routine, given the opportunity. When we repeat a behavior over and over, the brain moves that activity from thinking to non-thinking (habit) to free up more space in the thinking side of the brain for creativity. As a result, we all have lots of habits, both bad and good. We probably do more things unconsciously that we do consciously!

However, any habit that we now have can be replaced by overriding or replacing it with another habit. Buckminster Fuller says “You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” This promise gives us real hope that we can decide to create a new, healthy habit, and be successful at doing so.

My current goal is to make daily squatting a habit that will happen without my thinking about it. In the name of self-care and self-love, I do not recommend starting or continuing a new habit challenge if a big distraction is on the scene. This journey, this commitment, should feel like fun, not overwhelm.

How long does it take for a new model of behavior to become a habit? Recent research says it takes an average of 66 days to create a new habit. However, the actual number of days that takes will depend on the individual and on the specific behavior that the individual chooses to create. Creating habits is easier for some than others. Researchers reported that, for some, habits formed in as little as 18 days and, for others, it took as long as 254 days. It took about 84 days for participants in a research study to form the habit of 50 sit-ups every morning.

I do not know how long it will take me to automate my squatting behavior, but I plan to repeat it consciously as long as needed until it become a new healthy, unconscious habit. It looks like will power is less involved in this project than science. I need to repeat the behavior enough times for it to become ingrained or embedded in my brain. I can tell you that, as of the date of the publication of this article, my squatting behavior has not yet become habitual. However, I am very excited to notice that, as the days go by, I am much more likely to remember mid-morning that I need to squat 10 times (or 20 times or 30 times). In the beginning, I had no internal clock on the subject. Something new is happening, for sure!

Here are 7 tips for creating of a new, healthy habit that I have gleaned from my research and my experience so far.

1. Choose a Behavior

Choose a new behavior that is important you, that will make a difference in the quality of your life. Choose one new behavior at a time. Remember that your goal is to repeat your behavior often enough to embed it into your unconscious as a regular, involuntary behavior. Describe your behavior in writing. This can be very brief. “I want to include squatting in my everyday behavior without thinking about it.”

2. Identify Its Reward

After you have described your behavior, write a list of the benefits that you expect by making this behavior a habit. Fill a page. Keep this page nearby as a reference and an inspiration during your habit-creating journey. It is important to pay attention to the rewards and benefits you expect from your new habit. Each time you practice your behavior, focus on how good it feels to do the behavior. If you need to, refer to your list of benefits and then find the feeling. Having a clear reward in mind is important in the formation of a habit. Noticing how good it feels while you do the new behavior will also help make it a reality.

3. Create a Cue

Attach your new behavior to an existing habit or pattern or a time of the day that will act as a cue for you. I have attached my squatting behavior to my morning routine, after I have breakfast. If you want to run every day, you don’t tell yourself you will run when you have free time because you know that you will always find something else to do. Instead, run every day at the same time. Set your shoes at the door to remind you to run. A habit doesn’t stand alone in your brain. It is woven in with a whole network of actions. If it is repeated enough, those actions start to happen on autopilot.

4. Repeat Every Day

Repeat your new behavior every day. Preferable at the same time. Early is recommended. Otherwise the day can get away from you. Daily repetition is the most effective schedule or creating an involuntary behavior.

5. Ask a Friend or Friends to Join You

Your journey will be easier and more fun if you invite others to join you and you can support and inspire each other. (But keep going even if they don’t.) You might want to create a private Facebook group. Report to your group or your friend each day. Be accountable. Help them be accountable. When you are trying to create change, it’s more fun when you do it with others. And you are more likely to stay motivated and keep going.

6. Track your progress

It will help you to stay on track if you record your progress each day starting at day 1. I developed a Healthy Habit 30-day Calendar for this purpose and it works really well for me. You can make one for yourself. Or contact me at yogawithvia@gmail.com and I will send you a digital version to download and print. It looks like this.

Healthy Habit 30-Day Calendar

Healthy Habit 30-Day Calendar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see I started on February 1st. I think starting on the first of the month keeps things tidy, but this is not required. I recommend logging your behavior immediately after you do it. I increase the number of squats I do, every 10 days, but that is optional. Just for fun. Post your calendar where you can see it and watch the days grow. Remember, if it takes longer than 30 days for your behavior to become habitual, you will have to use a second calendar, or third, or…. Hopefully not more, but, as mentioned above, it will depend on your personality and the nature of the new behavior.

I also recommend that you also keep a journal of your thoughts and your progress. How you feel and how you move will change over the course of your practice. Focus on the positive aspects of your journey. Expand on them. Feel them as you are writing in your journal. What we pay attention to grows bigger.

7. Notice the Feel Good

Treat your new behavior as an act of self-care and self-love, not an obligation. Take time to appreciate the benefits of your new behavior, during this habit-creating practice and later when the behavior becomes a new involuntary habit. Refer to your list of benefits often.

Become totally immersed in your new behavior while you are doing it. Pay full attention to your breath and the behavior. Appreciate how good it feels. Notice and appreciate how good it makes you feel. Remember that what you pay attention to grows bigger.

Talk generously to yourself about your new behavior. “I can do this.” “I am very good at this.” “I feel good when I do this.” “This is easy for me.” “This is fun.” “I can sustain this.” I am already reaping the benefits of my new behavior.” “I am looking forward to reaping even more benefits when this becomes my new healthy habit.” Say what is true for you right now. This kind of loving, self-talk will support you in your journey and create a bridge to your destination. On the other hand, any language of self-doubt or resistance will have the opposite effect.

8. Keep Going

If you miss a day, keep going. If you miss a lot of days, start over. If after 30-days, your new behavior is not yet an involuntary habit, start the 30-days again. Remember you desire to incorporate this new behavior into your daily life, as regular as breathing, as regular as brushing your teeth, and with little or no thought. As Christopher Reeve says: “At first dreams seem impossible, then improbable, then inevitable.” Keep going until your new behavior becomes inevitable, and habitual!

Summary

Thank you, Dear Readers, for letting me drop into your lives for a little while. I hope that the information I shared in this column will help you get started if you want to create a new healthy habit. If I can answer any questions, please contact me at yogawithvia@gmail.com or devnew.intelligentmovementforever.com.

My mission is to help people unlock their intelligent, pain-free movement for better performance and healthy longevity. I help my students and clients pay attention to how they move and breath and nurture what works and quiet what doesn’t. I would love to hear from you if that strikes a chord.
I offer individual private sessions in my home studio in Col. Versalles, in Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, MX and online for 500 pesos. I can also come to your villa, resort, or condominium for 700 pesos per session. Contact me by email at yogawithvia@gmail.com or online at httpss://bookappointmentwithvia.setmore.com/ to book a session or comment below.

As you and I both know, health is wealth and movement is medicine,

Yours in Good Health,

 

Via

Gain Mobility and Reduce Stress Starting with the Feet

Note: This article was published December 2, 2014, in my column, Intelligent Movement Forever, which appears monthly in the Vallarta Daily News.

Dear Readers,

Last month, I discussed the biomechanics of moving, the body’s thirst for movement, diseases created by our tendency to move as little as possible, and the superfood benefits of walking on the uneven surfaces of Puerta Vallarta’s sidewalks, paths, streets, and beaches. I hope the information I presented got you moving more and walking more. Be sure to read the column if you haven’t already done so, because it tells you where I come from with regard to moving intelligently…forever.

ALERT! ALERT! Katy Bowman, author of Move Your DNA, which I featured in my first column, is posting a free 24-day-walking advent calendar with daily tidbits to support walking as a superfood for the body, starting December 1. You can join by clicking here

This month, I will discuss your body’s fascial connective tissue, which is the “soft-tissue scaffolding that links everything inside of you together,” the important role that fascia plays in how you move and how well you move, and how Jill Miller’s Roll Model Method, using a variety of Roll Model therapy balls, is part of the self-care healthcare revolution and can help you address the “issues in your tissues.” This column is informed and inspired by my many movement educator colleagues who are fascia nerds, including my Yoga Tune Up teacher, Jill Miller, and by Jill’s newly published book, The Roll Model: A Step-by-Step Guide to Erase Pain, Improve Mobililty, and Live Better in Your Body. The Roll Model is first and foremost an encyclopedia of very practical and very effective Roll Model therapy ball sequences, but it also provides helpful background information on fascia, proprioception, anatomy, breath, nervous system, and posture. The WHY as well as the HOW.

TheRollModel_cover_3d_preview (1)

Introduction to Fascia

Anatomy books have traditionally described our bodies as a muscular system and a skeletal system that worked together to move the body. But in very recently (past 5-7 years), movement scientists and fitness and anatomy experts have begun to recognize that fascia plays and has always played a very important role in movement function. Fascia is more than the “saran wrap” around the muscles. It is the organ system of stability and mechanoregulation. This raises important and exciting questions. Most injuries are soft-tissue (fascial) injuries, not muscle injuries. How do we treat and repair these injuries. There are 10 times more sensory nerve endings in fascia than in muscles, so proprioceptive stimulation must be aimed at fascia as well as muscles. And how do we work with and improve the health of our fascia now that we know the important role it plays in our movement function.

The Roll Model describes fascia this way: “Fascia is the fibrous and gelatinous bodywide web. It is a seam system that provides structure, protection, repair, and body sense. It is the interconnected soft-tissue scaffolding that gives your body form and shape. It links muscular proteins and other connective-tissue structures, such as bones, ligaments, and tendons.” This column is not going to say much more about fascia. If you are interested in digging deeper in that topic, you can use the Internet to increase your knowledge. And The Roll Model includes a very scholarly and friendly discussion of fascia.

Releasing Fascia using The Roll Model Method

On the other hand, please know that you do not have to become a fascia nerd or expert to benefit from treating and releasing your fascia. What I am going to say, based on my own experience and the experience of many others, is that Jill Miller’s Roll Model Method is one of the most effective, accessible ways for you to create healthy fascia and, in turn, improve your mobility and performance, reduce pain, prevent injuries, reduce stress held in your body, and generally address “the issues in your tissues.” Wherever you roll the Roll Model Therapy Balls roll, they impact your body’s fasciae (fascias). As Jill says, “When you roll with the balls, you induce local stretch into stiff and over-tightened tissues and improve the flow of their fluids. These taut tissues need your help in restoring their optimal positions. The balls are like little rubber scalpels that can reform you without incisions or stitches. The pressure and grip of the rubber helps you remodel yourself.”

The belly of the The Roll Model is eight chapters in and sets out Roll Method sequences for 18 body areas: core/torso, feet, ankle & lower leg, knees, thighs, hips & buttocks, pelvic funnel, lower back, upper back, rib cage, shoulder-rotator cuff, shoulder-elbow, forearms, fingers, hands & wrists, neck, head, face & jaw, front seam, back seam, and side seam. Each of the sequences uses one or more of the Roll Model Balls, (1) original Yoga Tune Up® balls, (2) Therapy Balls Plus, Alpha Balls, and the Coregeous Ball.

NOTE: You can purchase Roll Model Balls locally at Yoga Vallarta, Basilio Badillo 325, Old Town, Puerto Vallarta. You can also purchase them at www.therollmodel.com. If you do not have access to a Roll Model ball, you can substitute a tennis ball, which is easily available although it does not have the same grippy, pliable surface of the Roll Model balls that are especially designed for myofascial release.

Using the Role Model Method for the Feet

The Roll Model Method sequences for the feet use either one Original YTU ball or one Plus ball to roll the arch, inner arch, outer arch, heel, and ball of the foot. I am going to take you through the moves for the center arch and the transverse arch for your pleasure and benefit and to give you a peak at the Roll Model Method. I think that footwork on the Roll Model therapy balls is akin to walking on the unevern surfaces of the streets of Puerto Vallarta (see my column last month). Rolling the feet can help to prepare for or complement or even replace superfood walking that I described in Column 1. However, remember that variety is the spice of life, including the life of your movement practice, so you will probably want to do both.

NOTE: The images here are from The Roll Model and are provided by Tune Up Fitness Worldwide.

Feet Sequence for Center Arch and Transverse Arch

Test-Retest

Check in with your body first by standing and hinging forward at the hips with a flat back, locking your hands on the floor, or a chair, or a wall, whichever is available to you without rounding your back. Hold this position for 2 to 3 breaths and then return to standing with a flat back. You will want to repeat this flat-back forward bend after you finish your movements, as well. This will provide you with a test-retest that will give you feedback on the results of your moves.

Arch Cross. Action 1.

[table id=4 /]

Arch Cross. Action 2.

[table id=6 /]

NOTE: CrossFiber is defined in the Glossary of Terms as: To manipulate a ball perpendicularly or obliquely to the line of pull of a myofascial structure. Myofascia refers to the actual familiar-named muscle structures with their associated interpenetrating fascias.

Toe Motion. Action 1.

[table id=5 /]

Toe Motion. Action 2.

[table id=7 /]

Repeat all of these actions on the other foot.

And then remember to end your practice by retesting with a flat-back forward bend after you have finished these movements and notice any changes in your body as a result of rolling the balls on the center arch and the transverse arch.

Summing Up

I hope that the information I have provided here has given you a new or increased enthusiasm about addressing the “issues in your tissues.” I hope that you are able to find a Roll Model therapy ball, or at least a tennis ball, so that you can try these sample moves for the feet. If you are interested in learning more about the Roll Model Method of fascial release, I hope you will join me at my Mobility for Performance class at Crossfit Vallarta, in Plaza Caracol across from McDonald’s, at 7 pm on Thursday evenings, starting Dec. 4, 2014. This weekly class will include a heavy dose of Therapy Ball work and I will provide the therapy balls for students at the class. Another way to get started or keeping to is to to schedule a private or semi-private session with me at my home Pilates/Fitness Studio in Versalles. Or invite me to come to your location. Contact me at viaandersonimf@gmail.com for more information.

Please join us in the self-care healthcare revolution that is happening right here in Puerto Vallarta. You are never too young and never too old to start. Your body will love you for it. Your DNA will change for the better. You will gain mobility, reduce and prevent pain, better performance, and reduce stress. Do your homework, and check in with me next month for more information and inspiration on how to move more and move better. Your life, your good health, and your longevity may depend on it.

Wishing You Intelligent Movement Forever,
Via